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  • Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar describes why it’s important to dry endoscopes and how to do it.

    Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

    Retained moisture can foster the growth of microbes and biofilm inside endoscopes, and wet endoscopes have been linked to infections. This webinar will describe the importance of using effective, evidence-based methods for drying. The presenters will share their real-world experience using drying verification tools to evaluate patient-ready endoscopes for residual fluids. Participants will learn strategies for drying and storing endoscopes in accordance with guidelines and standards.

    Objectives

    By the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will be able to:

    1. Recognize that endoscope anatomy and reprocessing methods introduce a risk of retained moisture
    2. Discuss the clinical implications of retained moisture in flexible endoscopes
    3. Explain tools and methods for drying flexible endoscopes
    4. Describe current AORN, SGNA, and AAMI guidelines for drying endoscopes
    5. Explain strategies for detecting moisture and verifying that endoscopes are dry

    Content outline
    1. Background and rationale for evidence-based endoscope drying methods
    2. Evidence from the field on drying effectiveness
    3. Drying tools and equipment
    4. Strategies for enhancing drying and storage practices
    5. Sponsor acknowledgement (supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)


      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Krystina M. Hopkins, MPH

      Research Manager, Ofstead & Associates

      Krystina Hopkins is a research manager with Ofstead & Associates, Inc. where she leads projects related to reprocessing effectiveness and environmental health, including chronic conditions, vaccination, radiation hygiene, and healthcare costs. She has an MPH in environmental health, specializing in infectious disease. Her research has been published in AJIC, ICHE, Endoscopy International Open, Journal of Wound Care, Urology, AORN Journal, BI&T (AAMI's journal), and HSPA's PROCESS magazine. Ms. Hopkins has over fourteen years of hands-on health and healthcare-related research experience in diverse in-patient and outpatient settings. Prior to joining Ofstead in 2017, she supported clinical trials in environmental health, health economics, and community-based research as a research project manager at Medica Research Institute. Ms. Hopkins was also involved with projects related to molecular and microbiology, epidemiology, infectious disease, and occupational health in various roles at the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Health.

    1. Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar describes how to use biochemical tests to evaluate endoscope cleaning.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      New standards require cleaning verification tests for every high-risk endoscope, every time. This webinar discusses several types of cleaning verification tests and explains how to use them and interpret results. The presenters share their real-world experience using these tests with photos, videos, and case studies. Participants will learn strategies for setting up their own sustainable cleaning verification programs and using the findings to improve reprocessing outcomes.

      Objectives

      By the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Discuss the rationale for verifying cleaning effectiveness before sterilization or HLD
      2. List at least three types of biochemical tests for organic soil
      3. Explain methods for collecting samples and conducting cleaning verification tests
      4. Describe current guidelines for cleaning verification during reprocessing of flexible endoscopes
      5. Outline strategies for designing and implementing a cleaning verification program

      Content outline
      1. Rationale for performing cleaning verification tests
      2. How to conduct cleaning verification tests
      3. Setting expectations for cleaning verification findings
      4. Interpreting and acting on findings from cleaning verification tests
      5. Strategies for implementing a cleaning verification program
      6. Sponsor acknowledgement (supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Krystina M. Hopkins, MPH

      Research Manager, Ofstead & Associates

      Krystina Hopkins is a research manager with Ofstead & Associates, Inc. where she leads projects related to reprocessing effectiveness and environmental health, including chronic conditions, vaccination, radiation hygiene, and healthcare costs. She has an MPH in environmental health, specializing in infectious disease. Her research has been published in AJIC, ICHE, Endoscopy International Open, Journal of Wound Care, Urology, AORN Journal, BI&T (AAMI's journal), and HSPA's PROCESS magazine. Ms. Hopkins has over fourteen years of hands-on health and healthcare-related research experience in diverse in-patient and outpatient settings. Prior to joining Ofstead in 2017, she supported clinical trials in environmental health, health economics, and community-based research as a research project manager at Medica Research Institute. Ms. Hopkins was also involved with projects related to molecular and microbiology, epidemiology, infectious disease, and occupational health in various roles at the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Health.

    2. Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar shares strategies for inspecting endoscopes with lighted magnification.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      Damaged or dirty endoscopes place patients at risk for exposures, infections, and injuries. Guidelines and standards recommend visual inspection with lighted magnification for every endoscope, every time. This webinar explains the tools and methods available for conducting visual inspections of endoscope exteriors, describes important aspects of endoscope anatomy, and provides real-world images of common defects found on a variety of endoscope models.

      Objectives

      By the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Discuss the clinical implications of damage and debris found on endoscopes 
      2. Explain tools and methods for conducting visual inspection with lighted magnification
      3. Describe several exterior defects that are commonly identified during visual inspections
      4. List recommendations for visual inspection of flexible endoscopes in current guidelines 
      5. Describe risk assessment and quality improvement strategies for implementing visual inspection with lighted magnification

      Content outline
      1. Rationale for visual inspection using lighted magnification
      2. Endoscope anatomy
      3. How to conduct visual inspections using lighted magnification
      4. Common findings from visual inspection with lighted magnification
      5. Establishing a lighted magnification program
      6. Sponsor acknowledgement (supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Abigail G. Smart, MPH

      Research Associate, Ofstead & Associates

      Abigail Smart, MPH, joined the Ofstead team as a research associate in 2019, where she conducts surveillance of peer-reviewed evidence, industry information, and government reports and databases, and supports primary research and continuing education efforts. She has Bachelor of Arts degrees in Biology and Psychology and a Master of Public Health degree in Epidemiology. Ms. Smart has experience in a variety of research settings, including as a research assistant for a developmental psychology research group and as a technician in virology and chemistry labs where she conducted analysis for public health and environmental research. Her work has been published in AJIC, and she has presented at the Midwest Psychological Association and the University of Minnesota Cognitive Psychology Seminar. Prior to working at Ofstead, Ms. Smart served as a direct support professional and assistant team lead at care facilities for developmentally disabled adults. 

    3. Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar shares tips and tricks for using borescopes during visual inspection.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      This webinar describes methods for using borescopes, which are tools that can “scope the scope” to make sure ports and channels are clean and in good condition. Presenters will provide an introduction to the anatomy of various endoscope models and provide real-world photos and videos of brand-new scopes and defects observed during borescope exams. Participants will learn strategies for setting up a borescope program and responding to findings.

      Objectives

      By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Discuss the clinical implications of damage and debris found inside endoscopes
      2. Explain tools and methods for conducting borescope examinations of endoscope interiors
      3. Describe several defects that are commonly identified during borescope exams
      4. List recommendations for visual inspection of flexible endoscopes in current guidelines
      5. Describe risk assessment and quality improvement strategies

      Content outline
      1. Rationale for visually inspecting channels and ports
      2. Endoscope anatomy
      3. How to conduct borescope exams
      4. Common findings from borescope exams
      5. Establishing a borescope program
      6. Sponsor acknowledgement (supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Abigail G. Smart, MPH

      Research Associate, Ofstead & Associates

      Abigail Smart, MPH, joined the Ofstead team as a research associate in 2019, where she conducts surveillance of peer-reviewed evidence, industry information, and government reports and databases, and supports primary research and continuing education efforts. She has Bachelor of Arts degrees in Biology and Psychology and a Master of Public Health degree in Epidemiology. Ms. Smart has experience in a variety of research settings, including as a research assistant for a developmental psychology research group and as a technician in virology and chemistry labs where she conducted analysis for public health and environmental research. Her work has been published in AJIC, and she has presented at the Midwest Psychological Association and the University of Minnesota Cognitive Psychology Seminar. Prior to working at Ofstead, Ms. Smart served as a direct support professional and assistant team lead at care facilities for developmentally disabled adults. 

    4. Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar unlocks the keys to using the scientific method and evidence to support decision-making about factors that impact health and safety.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      What do dark chocolate, exercise, and fresh air have in common? In this webinar, three scientists will explain the scientific method and describe how to critically evaluate information about these stress-reducing interventions. Next, the presenters will model how to leverage evidence to support quality improvement and resource acquisition in healthcare facilities. Participants will learn how to seek support from stakeholders and incorporate scientific evidence into concise, effective communications for decision-makers.

      Objectives

      By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Explain how the scientific method can be used to evaluate the impact of wellness interventions including exercise, fresh air, and eating dark chocolate
      2. Provide at least three ways to assess the credibility of informational sources
      3. Describe how scientific approaches can be used to support decision-making and improve practices
      4. List three strategies for leveraging scientific evidence when collaborating with other stakeholders to address personnel and resource needs

      Content outline
      1. Background and rationale
      2. Foundations of science and critical thinking
      3. Evaluating sources of information
      4. Using scientific thinking to support strategy development
      5. Developing a communication strategy to support decision-making
      6. Sponsor acknowledgement (Supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Krystina M. Hopkins, MPH

      Research Manager, Ofstead & Associates

      Krystina Hopkins is a research manager with Ofstead & Associates, Inc. where she leads projects related to reprocessing effectiveness and environmental health, including chronic conditions, vaccination, radiation hygiene, and healthcare costs. She has an MPH in environmental health, specializing in infectious disease. Her research has been published in AJIC, ICHE, Endoscopy International Open, Journal of Wound Care, Urology, AORN Journal, BI&T (AAMI's journal), and HSPA's PROCESS magazine. Ms. Hopkins has over fourteen years of hands-on health and healthcare-related research experience in diverse in-patient and outpatient settings. Prior to joining Ofstead in 2017, she supported clinical trials in environmental health, health economics, and community-based research as a research project manager at Medica Research Institute. Ms. Hopkins was also involved with projects related to molecular and microbiology, epidemiology, infectious disease, and occupational health in various roles at the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Health.

      Abigail G. Smart, MPH

      Research Associate, Ofstead & Associates

      Abigail Smart, MPH, joined the Ofstead team as a research associate in 2019, where she conducts surveillance of peer-reviewed evidence, industry information, and government reports and databases, and supports primary research and continuing education efforts. She has Bachelor of Arts degrees in Biology and Psychology and a Master of Public Health degree in Epidemiology. Ms. Smart has experience in a variety of research settings, including as a research assistant for a developmental psychology research group and as a technician in virology and chemistry labs where she conducted analysis for public health and environmental research. Her work has been published in AJIC, and she has presented at the Midwest Psychological Association and the University of Minnesota Cognitive Psychology Seminar. Prior to working at Ofstead, Ms. Smart served as a direct support professional and assistant team lead at care facilities for developmentally disabled adults. 

    5. Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar dives into the nitty-gritty of biofilm and lays out strategies for how you can keep it off your medical devices and instruments.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      Soil, bioburden, biofilm… What does it mean for your sterile processing department? Biofilm adheres to surfaces, resists cleaning and disinfection efforts, and can foster antibiotic resistance. In this webinar, two presenters with expertise in epidemiology and microbiology explain the different types of residual organic debris that can be left behind due to inadequate reprocessing. They will discuss study findings and outbreak investigations and explore the possible roles of residual soil, damage, and retained moisture in biofilm development. Participants will learn how to develop and implement multifaceted policies and workflows to address factors contributing to biofilm formation in their departments.

      Objectives

      By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Explain the difference between soil, bioburden, and biofilm
      2. Discuss the impact of biofilm on reprocessing effectiveness for reusable medical instruments
      3. Describe the role of process controls, visual inspection, cleaning verification, and microbial surveillance in preventing biofilm-related problems
      4. List strategies for reducing biofilm and improving reprocessing outcomes

      Content outline
      1. Differences between soil, bioburden, and biofilm
      2. Clinical implications of biofilm on medical devices
      3. Theory and evidence on reprocessing effectiveness
      4. Reprocessing challenges that contribute to biofilm
      5. Strategies for improving practices and reducing biofilm
      6. Sponsor acknowledgement (Supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Krystina M. Hopkins, MPH

      Research Manager, Ofstead & Associates

      Krystina Hopkins is a research manager with Ofstead & Associates, Inc. where she leads projects related to reprocessing effectiveness and environmental health, including chronic conditions, vaccination, radiation hygiene, and healthcare costs. She has an MPH in environmental health, specializing in infectious disease. Her research has been published in AJIC, ICHE, Endoscopy International Open, Journal of Wound Care, Urology, AORN Journal, BI&T (AAMI's journal), and HSPA's PROCESS magazine. Ms. Hopkins has over fourteen years of hands-on health and healthcare-related research experience in diverse in-patient and outpatient settings. Prior to joining Ofstead in 2017, she supported clinical trials in environmental health, health economics, and community-based research as a research project manager at Medica Research Institute. Ms. Hopkins was also involved with projects related to molecular and microbiology, epidemiology, infectious disease, and occupational health in various roles at the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Health.

    6. Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar describes common challenges associated with ultrasound probes and provides practical strategies to help you address them in your facility.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      External and endocavitary ultrasound probes are used throughout healthcare facilities for a wide variety of procedures. Inadequate training and lack of standardization of reprocessing and maintenance protocols leads to poor adherence to best practices and raises risk of patient harm. In this webinar, two epidemiologists will discuss the basics of ultrasound probe use and reprocessing, summarize common challenges and clinical risks, and recommend strategies for quality improvement. This discussion will include an overview of ultrasound probes, recommendations for use of gel and sheaths, and evidence of patient harm associated with improperly reprocessed or maintained probes. Insights from auditing experience, guidelines, published literature, and government databases will be presented to empower frontline personnel to improve practices in their healthcare facility.

      Objectives

      By the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Discuss clinical risks associated with contaminated or damaged ultrasound probes
      2. Summarize guidelines for ultrasound probe reprocessing and quality assurance
      3. Explain how sheaths and gel contribute to probe contamination and infection risk
      4. Outline strategies for reducing risks associated with the use of ultrasound probes

      Content outline
      1. Observations from the field
      2. Basics on ultrasound probes
      3. Guidelines for ultrasound probe use and reprocessing
      4. Clinical risks and real-world challenges
      5. Strategies for assessing and improving practices
      6. Sponsor acknowledgement (Supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Abby G. Smart, MPH

      Research Associate, Ofstead & Associates

      Abby Smart has Bachelor of Arts degrees in Biology and Psychology and a Master of Public Health degree in Epidemiology. She joined the Ofstead team in 2019, where she performs literature reviews and participates in studies related to instrument reprocessing and infection control. Previously, she had experience in a variety of settings, including her work as a research assistant for a developmental psychology research group studying organ donation decision-making in young adults and the psychosocial well-being of immigrant children.  Abby also served as a technician in virology and chemistry labs, where she focused on virus-assisted disruption of algae cell metabolism for biofuel production and chemical analysis of water and food products to support public health and environmental research. She has presented her research at the Midwest Psychological Association and the University of Minnesota Cognitive Psychology Seminar.

    7. Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar on splashing provides an inside view of the evidence behind the need for PPE and the separation of dirty and clean areas in reprocessing suites.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      Have you ever wondered whether it really matters if instruments are submerged in cleaning solution when you’re scrubbing them? What about the three-foot separation between dirty and clean areas? Do germs stop at the red line? We decided to take a look at the science behind guidelines for reducing risks associated with splashes in sterile processing and endoscopy departments. In this webinar, two researchers share stories about cases of real-world splashes that exposed healthcare personnel to infection or injury. They explain guidelines and IFU for minimizing splash and reducing contamination and exposure in the decontamination area. The researchers describe findings from a pilot project that explored the generation of splashes by various reprocessing activities using a novel approach to photographing where droplets land on surfaces and PPE. They also describe simple tools that can be used to detect splashes in real-world settings, and share strategies for assessing and managing splash risk and reducing personnel exposure in SPD and endoscopy units.

      Objectives

      By the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Discuss the risk of personnel exposure to splash generated during medical procedures and sterile processing
      2. Describe guidelines and manufacturer instructions regarding dirty-to-clean workflow and splash reduction
      3. Explain findings of real-world experiments done to assess droplet dispersal during reprocessing
      4. List several strategies for assessing and managing splash risk and personnel exposure

      Content outline
      1. Background and rationale for focusing on splash risks in sterile processing areas
      2. Guidelines and manufacturer instructions for use
      3. Practical methods for evaluating splash
      4. Pilot study findings illustrating splashes in decontamination areas
      5. Strategies for managing splash during reprocessing
      6. Sponsor acknowledgement (Supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Krystina M. Hopkins, MPH

      Research Manager, Ofstead & Associates

      Krystina Hopkins is a research manager with Ofstead & Associates, Inc. where she leads projects related to reprocessing effectiveness and environmental health, including chronic conditions, vaccination, radiation hygiene, and healthcare costs. She has an MPH in environmental health, specializing in infectious disease. Her research has been published in AJIC, ICHE, Endoscopy International Open, Journal of Wound Care, Urology, AORN Journal, BI&T (AAMI's journal), and HSPA's PROCESS magazine. Ms. Hopkins has over fourteen years of hands-on health and healthcare-related research experience in diverse in-patient and outpatient settings. Prior to joining Ofstead in 2017, she supported clinical trials in environmental health, health economics, and community-based research as a research project manager at Medica Research Institute. Ms. Hopkins was also involved with projects related to molecular and microbiology, epidemiology, infectious disease, and occupational health in various roles at the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Health.

    8. Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar will build awareness of the FDA’s Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database to empower healthcare providers, personnel, and patients to access and report adverse events related to medical devices.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      Have you experienced surgical stapler misfires, burns from laparoscopic insulation failures, or robotic surgery cables snapping during procedures? Do you want to learn more about potential problems with medical devices in your facility? Anyone can submit adverse event reports to the FDA MAUDE database and use it to find reports of malfunctions and patient harm caused by damaged or defective medical devices. In this webinar, two researchers will walk participants through the process for submitting reports and provide strategies for searching the database. They will present case studies of adverse events reported to the FDA related to ultrasound probes, surgical staplers, robotic surgical systems, laparoscopic instruments, and endoscopes. Participants will learn how MAUDEs can be used to guide decision-making and improve patient safety.

      Objectives

      By the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Explain the purpose and value of Medical Device Reports in the Manufacturer and User Device Experience (MAUDE) database maintained by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
      2. Conduct searches, interpret search results, and submit reports to the MAUDE database
      3. Understand the implications of reporting requirements for manufacturers, health care providers, institutions, and patients
      4. Discuss device malfunctions and exposures/injuries related to the use of common medical devices (e.g., endoscopes, ultrasound probes, staplers, and robotic surgical systems)

      Content outline
      1. Background on FDA medical device reports and the MAUDE database
      2. How to conduct searches in the MAUDE database and interpret search results
      3. Strategies to maximize the value of database searches
      4. Case studies: Identifying relevant MAUDE reports for common problems
      5. Leveraging MAUDE reports to improve patient safety
      6. How to submit an adverse event report to the FDA
      7. Key takeaways and recommendations
      8. Sponsor acknowledgement (Supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Brandy L. Buro, MS, RDN

      Research Associate, Ofstead & Associates, Inc.

      Brandy Buro is a research associate at Ofstead & Associates, where she supports the team in conducting real-world research by leading surveillance of scientific literature and translating key findings for diverse audiences in industry and healthcare. Ms. Buro has an MS in public health and research methods and is a registered dietician with a strong background in biology, health behaviors, and education methodology. She has research experience in a variety of settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, and in the community. Her research has been published in AJIC, Journal of Wound Care, and the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. Prior to joining Ofstead in 2017, Ms. Buro worked as a clinical dietitian in various healthcare settings and led nutrition education programs at the University of Minnesota.

    9. Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

      This webinar explains how masks and respirators reduce the risk of infection transmission, and highlights key factors that should be considered when making decisions about respiratory protection.

      Eligible for 1.0 contact hour | HSPA | CBSPD | RN |

      Respiratory pathogens can be easily spread between people in healthcare and community settings. Effective respiratory protection is critical in shielding healthcare workers who are at high risk of infection. The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the importance of respiratory protection in healthcare settings, but also in preventing the spread of infection within the community. In this webinar, two presenters who specialize in epidemiology and infection control will discuss the basics of respiratory disease transmission and how face masks and respirators reduce risks. They will describe different types of respiratory protection, key features of each, and provide tips to support decision-making for how and when each should be used. Recent research on the effectiveness of different types of respiratory protection will be summarized and synthesized into practical, evidence-based recommendations for improving safety in healthcare settings and the community.

      Objectives

      By the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will be able to:

      1. Explain the importance of respiratory protection in protecting themselves and others
      2. Describe the different types of respiratory protection
      3. Discuss the impact of different mask products on droplet and aerosol transmission
      4. Use evidence in making decisions about extended use, reuse, and decontamination strategies

      Content outline
      1. Respiratory infection transmission and the importance of masks and respirators
      2. Tips for donning and doffing masks and respirators
      3. Types and features of respiratory protection
      4. Guidelines for respiratory protection in healthcare settings
      5. Strategies for maximizing respiratory protection
      6. References
      7. Sponsor acknowledgement (Supported by an educational grant from Healthmark)

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH

      President & CEO, Ofstead & Associates

      Cori L. Ofstead, MSPH, is an epidemiologist with 30 years of experience designing and conducting studies about the impact of clinical processes on patient outcomes. She has served as the Principal Investigator on numerous studies related to infection prevention, instrument reprocessing, and vaccination against infectious diseases. Ms. Ofstead is nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research, and her studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals including CHEST, AJIC, ICHE, Journal of Hospital Infection, Gastroenterology Nursing, and Vaccine. She currently serves as a reviewer for AJIC, Endoscopy, and the Journal of Urology, and is an active member of the editorial board for AJIC. She has presented the findings of her studies at national and international conferences sponsored by the CDC, APIC, IAHCSMM, AORN, SGNA, AGA, and several universities. In addition, she currently serves as a preceptor for epidemiology students in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota.

      Krystina M. Hopkins, MPH

      Research Manager, Ofstead & Associates

      Krystina Hopkins is a research manager with Ofstead & Associates, Inc. where she leads projects related to reprocessing effectiveness and environmental health, including chronic conditions, vaccination, radiation hygiene, and healthcare costs. She has an MPH in environmental health, specializing in infectious disease. Her research has been published in AJIC, ICHE, Endoscopy International Open, Journal of Wound Care, Urology, AORN Journal, BI&T (AAMI's journal), and HSPA's PROCESS magazine. Ms. Hopkins has over fourteen years of hands-on health and healthcare-related research experience in diverse in-patient and outpatient settings. Prior to joining Ofstead in 2017, she supported clinical trials in environmental health, health economics, and community-based research as a research project manager at Medica Research Institute. Ms. Hopkins was also involved with projects related to molecular and microbiology, epidemiology, infectious disease, and occupational health in various roles at the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Department of Health.